Articulation Without Oral Sensory Control Oral sensory deprivation was induced in two subjects by nerve block injections, and the effect on articulation was investigated. Twenty-four bisyllabic words produced under control and nerve block conditions were phonetically transcribed according to a close transcription scheme. Wide-band spectrograms provided acoustic information which was helpful in clarifying certain articulatory ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1971
Articulation Without Oral Sensory Control
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cheryl M. Scott
    Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana
  • R. L. Ringel
    Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1971
Articulation Without Oral Sensory Control
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1971, Vol. 14, 804-818. doi:10.1044/jshr.1404.804
History: Received December 12, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1971, Vol. 14, 804-818. doi:10.1044/jshr.1404.804
History: Received December 12, 1970

Oral sensory deprivation was induced in two subjects by nerve block injections, and the effect on articulation was investigated. Twenty-four bisyllabic words produced under control and nerve block conditions were phonetically transcribed according to a close transcription scheme. Wide-band spectrograms provided acoustic information which was helpful in clarifying certain articulatory events. Articulatory changes caused by deprivation were largely nonphonemic in nature and included the loss of retroflexion and liprounding gestures, less close fricative constrictions, and retracted place of articulation. Results were interpreted to suggest that speech control involves a closed-loop component which is operative for certain types of articulatory events and not for others.

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