Early Components of the Averaged Electroencephalic Response in Relation to Rise-Decay Time and Duration of Pure Tones Early components of the averaged electroencephalic response (AER) to auditory stimuli were elicited in 10 normal-hearing subjects. Stimuli were 1000-Hz tones having rise-decay times of 5, 10, and 25 msec combined with duration plateaus of 20 and 40 msec and clicks. 1024 stimuli were presented monaurally at a rate of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1971
Early Components of the Averaged Electroencephalic Response in Relation to Rise-Decay Time and Duration of Pure Tones
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ronald H. Lane
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Gerard L. Kupperman
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Robert Goldstein
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1971
Early Components of the Averaged Electroencephalic Response in Relation to Rise-Decay Time and Duration of Pure Tones
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1971, Vol. 14, 408-415. doi:10.1044/jshr.1402.408
History: Received July 16, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1971, Vol. 14, 408-415. doi:10.1044/jshr.1402.408
History: Received July 16, 1970

Early components of the averaged electroencephalic response (AER) to auditory stimuli were elicited in 10 normal-hearing subjects. Stimuli were 1000-Hz tones having rise-decay times of 5, 10, and 25 msec combined with duration plateaus of 20 and 40 msec and clicks. 1024 stimuli were presented monaurally at a rate of 6.67/sec.

All subjects gave responses to click stimuli with major peak latencies in milliseconds of approximately: Po = 10.7, Na = 19.7, Pa = 29.7, Nb = 47.2 and Pb = 64.0. Clearly identifiable responses for pure tones were obtained in six to ten subjects. For these subjects, the Pa-Nb amplitude was enhanced by stimuli having the 5-msec rise-decay time as compared to the 25-msec rise-decay time stimuli. The Nb-Pb amplitude was greater for the 5- and 10-msec rise-decay time stimuli when compared to the 25-msec rise-decay time stimuli. The 40-msec duration gave statistically greater Nb-Pb amplitudes than the 20-msec duration. No statistically significant effects were found for the remaining peaks. Amplitudes were greater and latencies were shorter for clicks than for tones. Amplitude differences between click and tone responses diminished with each successive peak and were almost gone for Nb-Pb. Results are discussed in relation to neural unit synchronization.

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