Speech Discrimination in Noise The linear portion of the articulation function in noise was investigated using 16 normal-hearing and 15 sensorineural-impaired subjects. NU Auditory Test No. 6 was presented in cafeteria noise at signal-to-noise ratios of 4, 8, and 12 dB. Although the sensorineural group had poorer means, the slopes for the two groups ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1971
Speech Discrimination in Noise
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. C. Cooper, Jr.
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Betty P. Cutts
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1971
Speech Discrimination in Noise
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1971, Vol. 14, 332-337. doi:10.1044/jshr.1402.332
History: Received October 20, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1971, Vol. 14, 332-337. doi:10.1044/jshr.1402.332
History: Received October 20, 1969

The linear portion of the articulation function in noise was investigated using 16 normal-hearing and 15 sensorineural-impaired subjects. NU Auditory Test No. 6 was presented in cafeteria noise at signal-to-noise ratios of 4, 8, and 12 dB. Although the sensorineural group had poorer means, the slopes for the two groups were not significantly different, 3.57% per dB for normals and 3.47% per dB for sensorineurals. The wide range of variability demonstrated by both groups indicates the importance of determining a patient’s discrimination potential in noise.

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