The Effects of Certain Drugs on Phonation Five young adult male subjects with normal larynxes were recorded as they sustained phonation during one normal and three drug conditions. The vocal tasks included obtaining the total fundamental frequency range, tone-matching ability, and vocal fry production, and were performed by the subject (1) before drugs, (2) following injection of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1971
The Effects of Certain Drugs on Phonation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara V. Fishman
    Veterans Administration Hospital, San Francisco, California
  • Robert E. McGlone
    Veterans Administration Hospital, San Francisco, California
  • Thomas Shipp
    Veterans Administration Hospital, San Francisco, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1971
The Effects of Certain Drugs on Phonation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1971, Vol. 14, 301-306. doi:10.1044/jshr.1402.301
History: Received December 15, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1971, Vol. 14, 301-306. doi:10.1044/jshr.1402.301
History: Received December 15, 1969

Five young adult male subjects with normal larynxes were recorded as they sustained phonation during one normal and three drug conditions. The vocal tasks included obtaining the total fundamental frequency range, tone-matching ability, and vocal fry production, and were performed by the subject (1) before drugs, (2) following injection of a tranquilizer-narcotic premedication, (3) after topical anesthesia of the larynx, and (4) during a drug-recovery period. Results showed no significant differences between conditions on any of the measures of sustained phonation. It was concluded that neither depressed cortical function nor sensory deprivation of the laryngeal mucosa alters the subject’s phonatory capabilities essential to the performance of the selected vocal tasks.

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