A Comparison of Averaged Evoked Response Amplitudes Using Nonaffective and Affective Verbal Stimuli In an attempt to study the enhancement of the Average Evoked Response, AERs were obtained from 26 subjects for 50 affective (emotional) and 50 nonaffective (nonemotional) verbal stimuli. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) of the response amplitude revealed a significantly (p < 0.01) reduced N1-P1 peak amplitude for the affective stimuli. Although ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1971
A Comparison of Averaged Evoked Response Amplitudes Using Nonaffective and Affective Verbal Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lamar L. Young, Jr.
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia
  • John S. Horner
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1971
A Comparison of Averaged Evoked Response Amplitudes Using Nonaffective and Affective Verbal Stimuli
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1971, Vol. 14, 295-300. doi:10.1044/jshr.1402.295
History: Received August 11, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1971, Vol. 14, 295-300. doi:10.1044/jshr.1402.295
History: Received August 11, 1969

In an attempt to study the enhancement of the Average Evoked Response, AERs were obtained from 26 subjects for 50 affective (emotional) and 50 nonaffective (nonemotional) verbal stimuli. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) of the response amplitude revealed a significantly (p < 0.01) reduced N1-P1 peak amplitude for the affective stimuli. Although there was a trend for the P1-N2 peak amplitude to be depressed for the affective words, the trend was not significant. The theory is explored that the emotionality of the affective words was sufficiently great to create inhibition (either conscious or unconscious) of the N1-P1 peak by some subjects in response to what they considered socially unacceptable stimuli.

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