Articulation and Stress/Juncture Production Under Oral Anesthetization and Masking Eight subjects, half of them naive and the other half aware of the purpose of the experiment, spoke 30 pairs of sentences involving the production of intricate stress/juncture patterns along with a passage containing all major consonant phonemes in English in various intraword positions. All subjects spoke all materials under: ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1971
Articulation and Stress/Juncture Production Under Oral Anesthetization and Masking
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sylvia A. Gammon
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • Philip J. Smith
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • Raymond G. Daniloff
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • Chin W. Kim
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1971
Articulation and Stress/Juncture Production Under Oral Anesthetization and Masking
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1971, Vol. 14, 271-282. doi:10.1044/jshr.1402.271
History: Received May 15, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1971, Vol. 14, 271-282. doi:10.1044/jshr.1402.271
History: Received May 15, 1969

Eight subjects, half of them naive and the other half aware of the purpose of the experiment, spoke 30 pairs of sentences involving the production of intricate stress/juncture patterns along with a passage containing all major consonant phonemes in English in various intraword positions. All subjects spoke all materials under: (1) normal conditions, (2) 110 dB re: 0.0002 ubar white noise masking, (3) extensive local anesthesia of the oral cavity, and (4) masking and anesthesia combined. Stress and juncture patterns were correctly produced despite all feedback disruption, and there was no difference between naive and aware subjects. Noise masking produced a decline in speech quality and a disruption of normal rhythm, both of which were even more seriously affected by anesthesia and anesthesia plus masking. There were no significant vowel misarticulations under any condition, but there was nearly a 20% rate of consonant misartiqulation under anesthesia and anesthesia and noise. Mis-articulation was most severe for fricatives and affricates in the labial and alveolar regions, presumably because these productions demand a high degree of precision of articulate shape and location and hence, intact feedback. Results are discussed in terms of feedback-control mechanisms for speech production.

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