Induced Biophysical Artifacts in Averaged Electroencephalic Response (AER) Audiometry Induced biophysical artifacts (myogenic responses) were obtained from six subjects during a test procedure similar to that used for recording the late components of the averaged electroencephalic response (AER) to auditory stimuli. The responses obtained were unlike the characteristic uncontaminated AER to sound with regard to latency and amplitude, determined ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1971
Induced Biophysical Artifacts in Averaged Electroencephalic Response (AER) Audiometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ernest J. Moore
    Central Wisconsin Colony, Madison, Wisconsin
  • John P. Reneau
    Central Wisconsin Colony, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1971
Induced Biophysical Artifacts in Averaged Electroencephalic Response (AER) Audiometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 82-91. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.82
History: Received September 12, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 82-91. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.82
History: Received September 12, 1969

Induced biophysical artifacts (myogenic responses) were obtained from six subjects during a test procedure similar to that used for recording the late components of the averaged electroencephalic response (AER) to auditory stimuli. The responses obtained were unlike the characteristic uncontaminated AER to sound with regard to latency and amplitude, determined prior to obtaining the induced biophysical response. However, the variety of voluntary biophysical activities (jaw clenching, eye-blinks, forehead movement) performed while recording the AER to sound tended to obscure the characteristic response. Some possible methods for reducing or eliminating induced biophysical artifacts during AER audiometry are presented.

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