The Use of Circumaural Earphones in Audiometry Four circumaural muffs were compared with the phone/cushion device now standard for audiometry, the Willson “Sound-Barrier,” the Maico “Auraldome,” and 2 versions of the Tracor “Otocup.” Psychoacoustic loudness balancing by normal subjects was performed, and physical measurements by probe-tube microphone and by flat-plate coupler. Neither physical method was related closely ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1971
The Use of Circumaural Earphones in Audiometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Donald Harris
    Naval Submarine Medical Center, Groton, Connecticut
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1971
The Use of Circumaural Earphones in Audiometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 58-70. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.58
History: Received August 25, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 58-70. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.58
History: Received August 25, 1970

Four circumaural muffs were compared with the phone/cushion device now standard for audiometry, the Willson “Sound-Barrier,” the Maico “Auraldome,” and 2 versions of the Tracor “Otocup.” Psychoacoustic loudness balancing by normal subjects was performed, and physical measurements by probe-tube microphone and by flat-plate coupler. Neither physical method was related closely enough at 4 kHz and up to the fundamental loudness balancing to serve as an independent calibration system for all circumaural muffs. Need was expressed for a standard artificial head incorporating flexible pinnae and a fixed probe microphone. At present, circumaural devices can reasonably be used from 0.5–3 kHz, but at 4 kHz and up any audiometry should be considered only a screening procedure, with individual recheck using the standard device in an acceptable workspace to examine all ears which do not exceed by 15 dB any criterion set by the demands of the situation.

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