Reading and Auditory-Visual Equivalences A retarded boy, unable to read printed words orally or with comprehension, could match spoken words to pictures and could name pictures. After being taught to match spoken to printed words, he was then capable of reading comprehension (matching the printed words to pictures) and oral reading (naming the printed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1971
Reading and Auditory-Visual Equivalences
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Murray Sidman
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1971
Reading and Auditory-Visual Equivalences
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 5-13. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.05
History: Received January 2, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 5-13. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.05
History: Received January 2, 1970

A retarded boy, unable to read printed words orally or with comprehension, could match spoken words to pictures and could name pictures. After being taught to match spoken to printed words, he was then capable of reading comprehension (matching the printed words to pictures) and oral reading (naming the printed words aloud).

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