Temporal Segmentation-Influence of the Envelope Function on Perception This paper describes the influence of the envelope function on the spectrum of gated sounds. Comparisons are made between the spectrum of sine waves gated by rectangular, trapezoidal, and exponential envelopes. It is shown that the exponential envelope approximates the physical reality of the natural vocal emission. The spectral distortion ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1971
Temporal Segmentation-Influence of the Envelope Function on Perception
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Albert Landercy
    Institut de Phonétique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1971
Temporal Segmentation-Influence of the Envelope Function on Perception
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 47-57. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.47
History: Received October 8, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 47-57. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.47
History: Received October 8, 1969

This paper describes the influence of the envelope function on the spectrum of gated sounds. Comparisons are made between the spectrum of sine waves gated by rectangular, trapezoidal, and exponential envelopes. It is shown that the exponential envelope approximates the physical reality of the natural vocal emission. The spectral distortion given by such gating functions is calculated and it is shown quantitatively that they introduce less spectral distortion than rectangular and trapezoidal envelopes. A relationship between the on/off slopes time constant and the duration of the gated sound is defined. This relationship gives a minimum of spectral distortion while ensuring that the envelope function maintains some physical reality. The influence of the spectral distortion on perception is discussed as a function of the critical bands and the masking effect. It is instrumentally shown that, for sine wave sounds with frequencies ƒ, exponentially gated during to with to > 1/ƒ, the widening and the rebounds of the spectrum towards the high frequency range are masked by the specific loudness of the central component; it is essentially the low frequency range which is altered at the perceptual level.

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