Frequency Transposition in the Teaching of Speech to Deaf Children Conventional (linear) amplification supplemented with frequency transposition was compared with conventional amplification alone in teaching speech to 18 severely deaf children, aged 7–11 years. Subjects were each given ten hours training in the articulation of 64 CV syllables. Six were trained with conventional amplification to both ears (CL + CR), ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1971
Frequency Transposition in the Teaching of Speech to Deaf Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Ling
    McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
  • Hermina Maretic
    McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1971
Frequency Transposition in the Teaching of Speech to Deaf Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 37-46. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.37
History: Received August 18, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 37-46. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.37
History: Received August 18, 1969

Conventional (linear) amplification supplemented with frequency transposition was compared with conventional amplification alone in teaching speech to 18 severely deaf children, aged 7–11 years. Subjects were each given ten hours training in the articulation of 64 CV syllables. Six were trained with conventional amplification to both ears (CL + CR), six with conventional amplification to the left ear and transposition to the right (CL+TR), and the remaining six under the reverse condition, (CR + TL). All subjects made significant gains in correctly reproducing both consonants and vowels under all three conditions of amplification, not simply the one employed in training. Vowels were more frequently confused under the two transposition conditions. Results indicated a significant left-ear preference for vowels. Similar confusions of consonant features occurred under each amplification condition. Conventional amplification supplemented with transposition was not found to be superior to conventional amplification alone as an aid in articulation training.

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