Differences in Disfluency Behavior Between Male and Female Nonstuttering Children Speech samples of 150 words were obtained from 92 first-grade children, 46 males and 46 females. Children’s Thematic Apperception Test pictures were employed to elicit verbalization. Occurrences of types of disfluencies were identified from taped recordings. No sex differences were found with regard to total number of disfluencies. Comparisons of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1971
Differences in Disfluency Behavior Between Male and Female Nonstuttering Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph A. Kools
    University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
  • Joan D. Berryman
    University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1971
Differences in Disfluency Behavior Between Male and Female Nonstuttering Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 125-130. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.125
History: Received August 21, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1971, Vol. 14, 125-130. doi:10.1044/jshr.1401.125
History: Received August 21, 1969

Speech samples of 150 words were obtained from 92 first-grade children, 46 males and 46 females. Children’s Thematic Apperception Test pictures were employed to elicit verbalization. Occurrences of types of disfluencies were identified from taped recordings.

No sex differences were found with regard to total number of disfluencies. Comparisons of incidence of specific types of disfluencies revealed that males exhibited a greater number of incomplete phrases than did females.

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