Experiments on the Use of the Touch-ToneR Telephone as a Communication Aid for the Deaf A series of tests are described in which a Touch-Tone1 telephone system serves as a communication aid for the deaf. Two methods are explored for presenting visual outputs of dial manipulations. Both arrangements depend on the calling party spelling the message to the deaf receiver in a previously agreed upon ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1970
Experiments on the Use of the Touch-ToneR Telephone as a Communication Aid for the Deaf
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John R. Nelson
    Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1970
Experiments on the Use of the Touch-ToneR Telephone as a Communication Aid for the Deaf
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 30-36. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.30
History: Received October 31, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 30-36. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.30
History: Received October 31, 1968

A series of tests are described in which a Touch-Tone1 telephone system serves as a communication aid for the deaf. Two methods are explored for presenting visual outputs of dial manipulations. Both arrangements depend on the calling party spelling the message to the deaf receiver in a previously agreed upon code. One arrangement presents lighted digits on a representation of a Touch-Tone dial. The second arrangement displays alphanumeric characters from coding schemes used. Speed and accuracy determinations are made. Typical speeds are 4 and 8 wpm for the first and second methods respectively. Both arrangements yield comparable error percentages of less than 1% after brief learning periods are completed. These performances are achieved without special training or skill.

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