Anticipation and Stuttering: A Pupillographic Study Changes in pupil size were studied in 24 stuttering and 30 nonstuttering adults during a 4-sec period following the presentation of single-word auditory stimuli and before a signal to respond. Subjects were required first to respond with a single word which was the opposite of the word presented and later ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1969
Anticipation and Stuttering: A Pupillographic Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth C. Gray
    Macquarie University, New South Wales, Australia
  • Dean E. Williams
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1969
Anticipation and Stuttering: A Pupillographic Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1969, Vol. 12, 833-839. doi:10.1044/jshr.1204.833
History: Received December 11, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1969, Vol. 12, 833-839. doi:10.1044/jshr.1204.833
History: Received December 11, 1968

Changes in pupil size were studied in 24 stuttering and 30 nonstuttering adults during a 4-sec period following the presentation of single-word auditory stimuli and before a signal to respond. Subjects were required first to respond with a single word which was the opposite of the word presented and later to give a one-word free-association response to words of both emotional and neutral connotations. Pupil size was measured also while subjects merely listened to the word stimuli. The process of attending to an auditory stimulus was associated with pupil dilation. Pupil response was significantly greater (in absolute diameter and in dilation) when subjects were required to give an oral response to the stimulus than when they simply listened to the stimulus. Furthermore, the extent of the pupil reaction was related to the nature of the stimulus presented. Such differences in arousal did not occur to any greater degree in stutterers than in nonstutterers. Moreover, among stutterers, measures of pupil size were not predictive of stuttering. Thus, the cues which the stutterer associates with the anticipation of stuttering do not appear to be reflected in the physiological changes associated with pupillary movement.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access