A Psycholinguistic Approach to Study of the Language Deficit in Aphasia Three protocols from two aphasic subjects were studied intensively in the framework of generative linguistics. Each protocol contained more than 300 utterances elicited by instructing the subject to read a word and use it in a sentence. This technique allowed some experimental control of language, yet permitted linguistic productivity. These ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1969
A Psycholinguistic Approach to Study of the Language Deficit in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hildred Schuell
    University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Robert Shaw
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • William Brewer
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1969
A Psycholinguistic Approach to Study of the Language Deficit in Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1969, Vol. 12, 794-806. doi:10.1044/jshr.1204.794
History: Received December 19, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1969, Vol. 12, 794-806. doi:10.1044/jshr.1204.794
History: Received December 19, 1968

Three protocols from two aphasic subjects were studied intensively in the framework of generative linguistics. Each protocol contained more than 300 utterances elicited by instructing the subject to read a word and use it in a sentence. This technique allowed some experimental control of language, yet permitted linguistic productivity. These protocols, and protocols from 12 nonaphasic subjects, were compared over a number of syntactic and semantic dimensions. Aphasic subjects showed restricted use of vocabulary and sentence types. Aphasics used fewer optional transformations than controls and never elected a transformation that added words to the sentence. The frequency of double-based transformations used by aphasics was less than a third of that of controls. Syntactically correct sentences produced by aphasics showed reduced semantic specificity. Results are interpreted to show that aphasic subjects have reduced lexical and semantic options, and operate under restrictions of length of unit that can be processed.

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