Test-Retest Reliability of Serial Pure-Tone Audiograms in Children at a School for the Deaf Successive air-conduction audiograms obtained between ages 1¼ and 12 years and recorded in the charts of 75 children at a school for the deaf were analyzed statistically. Approximately half of 414 audiogram pairs differed by at least 20 dB for 2 or more frequencies, and 34% of 3203 paired frequency ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1969
Test-Retest Reliability of Serial Pure-Tone Audiograms in Children at a School for the Deaf
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Isabelle Rapin
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
  • Louis D. Costa
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1969
Test-Retest Reliability of Serial Pure-Tone Audiograms in Children at a School for the Deaf
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1969, Vol. 12, 402-412. doi:10.1044/jshr.1202.402
History: Received December 19, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1969, Vol. 12, 402-412. doi:10.1044/jshr.1202.402
History: Received December 19, 1968

Successive air-conduction audiograms obtained between ages 1¼ and 12 years and recorded in the charts of 75 children at a school for the deaf were analyzed statistically. Approximately half of 414 audiogram pairs differed by at least 20 dB for 2 or more frequencies, and 34% of 3203 paired frequency scores differed by at least 20 dB. Conductive losses, moderate hearing losses, and perhaps mild mental retardation were associated with unreliability. Audiograms performed at the school by a nonprofessional audiologist were especially unreliable. The desirability of retesting a child until a stable threshold is obtained and of indicating the zone of uncertainty around each threshold point was stressed. When the zone of uncertainty is wide, a verbal label describing the estimated severity of the loss might be preferable to possibly invalid numerical information.

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