Acoustic Redundancy and the Perception of Time-Compressed Speech An experiment is reported in which time-compressed sentences were heard spoken either in normal intonation or in intonation patterns that conflicted with their underlying syntactic structure. Although there was an overall decrement in intelligibility with increasing compression, sentences heard in normal intonation were significantly better able to withstand the debilitating ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   March 01, 1975
Acoustic Redundancy and the Perception of Time-Compressed Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Arthur Wingfield
    Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1975
Acoustic Redundancy and the Perception of Time-Compressed Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1975, Vol. 18, 96-104. doi:10.1044/jshr.1801.96
History: Received June 7, 1974 , Accepted September 9, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1975, Vol. 18, 96-104. doi:10.1044/jshr.1801.96
History: Received June 7, 1974; Accepted September 9, 1974

An experiment is reported in which time-compressed sentences were heard spoken either in normal intonation or in intonation patterns that conflicted with their underlying syntactic structure. Although there was an overall decrement in intelligibility with increasing compression, sentences heard in normal intonation were significantly better able to withstand the debilitating effects of compression than those with anomalous intonation. An error analysis of subject responses suggests that intonation normally operates to supply supplemental cues for determining syntactic structure as a step in the perceptual coding of heard speech.

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