Memory for Speech and Speech for Memory Thirty kindergarteners, 15 who substituted /w/ for /r/ and 15 with correct articulation, received two perception tests and a memory test that included /w/ and /r/ in minimally contrastive syllables. Although both groups had nearly perfect perception of the experimenter’s productions of /w/ and /r/, misarticulating subjects perceived their own ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1975
Memory for Speech and Speech for Memory
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John L. Locke
    Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
  • Kathryn J. Kutz
    Children’s Research Center, Champaign, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1975
Memory for Speech and Speech for Memory
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1975, Vol. 18, 176-191. doi:10.1044/jshr.1801.176
History: Received January 24, 1974 , Accepted July 25, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1975, Vol. 18, 176-191. doi:10.1044/jshr.1801.176
History: Received January 24, 1974; Accepted July 25, 1974

Thirty kindergarteners, 15 who substituted /w/ for /r/ and 15 with correct articulation, received two perception tests and a memory test that included /w/ and /r/ in minimally contrastive syllables. Although both groups had nearly perfect perception of the experimenter’s productions of /w/ and /r/, misarticulating subjects perceived their own tape-recorded w/r productions as /w/. In the memory task these same misarticulating subjects committed significantly more /w/-/r/ confusions in unspoken recall. The discussion considers why people subvocally rehearse; a developmental period in which children do not rehearse; ways subvocalization may aid recall, including motor and acoustic encoding; an echoic store that provides additional recall support if subjects rehearse vocally, and perception of self- and other-produced phonemes by misarticulating children—including its relevance to a motor theory of perception. Evidence is presented that speech for memory can be sufficiently impaired to cause memory disorder. Conceptions that restrict speech disorder to an impairment of communication are challenged.

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