Acoustic-Reflex Response to Sustained Signals Acoustic-reflex activity was observed for 10 normal-hearing young adults using three sustained activating signals: 500-Hz tone, 4000-Hz tone, and broad-band noise. Reflex activity was observed over a period of three to five minutes at activator levels of 5, 10, and 15 dB above individual acoustic-reflex thresholds. General findings were that ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1975
Acoustic-Reflex Response to Sustained Signals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Terry L. Wiley
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Raymond S. Karlovich
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1975
Acoustic-Reflex Response to Sustained Signals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1975, Vol. 18, 148-157. doi:10.1044/jshr.1801.148
History: Received April 18, 1974 , Accepted July 1, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1975, Vol. 18, 148-157. doi:10.1044/jshr.1801.148
History: Received April 18, 1974; Accepted July 1, 1974

Acoustic-reflex activity was observed for 10 normal-hearing young adults using three sustained activating signals: 500-Hz tone, 4000-Hz tone, and broad-band noise. Reflex activity was observed over a period of three to five minutes at activator levels of 5, 10, and 15 dB above individual acoustic-reflex thresholds. General findings were that (1) acoustic-reflex adaptation was present to some degree for all three activating signals, (2) the amount of reflex adaptation varied with the spectrum of activating signals (reflex adaptation was greatest for the 4000-Hz activator, less for the noise activator, and least for the 500-Hz activating signal), (3) the rate of reflex adaptation differed with activator spectrum (reflex-adaptation rate was relatively rapid for the 4000-Hz activator, slower for noise, and much slower for the 500-Hz activating signal), and (4) reflex adaptation did not appear to vary systematically with activating-signal level except for the 500-Hz activator, in which case reflex adaptation appeared to begin earlier in time and to be of greater magnitude as the activating-signal level was increased.

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