Comparison of Traditional and Condensed Articulation Tests Examining the Same Number of Sounds The same recorded speech samples of subjects with articulation defects were presented to judges under two listening conditions. Under one condition each judge was to listen for only one sound per sample word, the traditional method for testing articulation. Under the second condition each judge was to listen for one, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
Comparison of Traditional and Condensed Articulation Tests Examining the Same Number of Sounds
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Macalyne Fristoe
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Ronald Goldman
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
Comparison of Traditional and Condensed Articulation Tests Examining the Same Number of Sounds
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 583-589. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.583
History: Received October 11, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 583-589. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.583
History: Received October 11, 1967

The same recorded speech samples of subjects with articulation defects were presented to judges under two listening conditions. Under one condition each judge was to listen for only one sound per sample word, the traditional method for testing articulation. Under the second condition each judge was to listen for one, two, or three sounds in the various sample words, a quicker method for testing the same number of sounds. Comparisons of the results showed that there was little difference in the judges' performance under the two listening conditions. This suggests that speech pathologists can effectively evaluate more than one sound per word and that a condensed type of test will give approximately the same amount of information as the longer, traditional type of test.

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