Monaural and Binaural Speech Perception through Hearing Aids under Noise and Reverberation with Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Speech perception was studied with normal and hearing-impaired subjects in a single sound-treated room at reverberation times T = 0.3 and 0.6 seconds. Binaural and monaural perception through hearing aids was compared in quiet and in the presence of a babble of eight voices. The speech and noise sources subtended ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1974
Monaural and Binaural Speech Perception through Hearing Aids under Noise and Reverberation with Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anna K. Nabelek
    Gallaudet College, Washington, D.C.
  • J. M. Pickett
    Gallaudet College, Washington, D.C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1974
Monaural and Binaural Speech Perception through Hearing Aids under Noise and Reverberation with Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1974, Vol. 17, 724-739. doi:10.1044/jshr.1704.724
History: Received January 7, 1974 , Accepted July 1, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1974, Vol. 17, 724-739. doi:10.1044/jshr.1704.724
History: Received January 7, 1974; Accepted July 1, 1974

Speech perception was studied with normal and hearing-impaired subjects in a single sound-treated room at reverberation times T = 0.3 and 0.6 seconds. Binaural and monaural perception through hearing aids was compared in quiet and in the presence of a babble of eight voices. The speech and noise sources subtended an angle of 60° on a circle 11 feet in radius centered at the listener to give an advantage for binaural perception. Binaural gain was taken as the difference in speech-to-noise ratios for the same word-recognition score comparing binaural and monaural results. The average binaural gain was 3 dB for normal subjects and 1.5 dB for hearing-impaired subjects at both values of reverberation. Only the hearing-impaired subjects showed an advantage for binaural listening in quiet. The small increase in reverberation caused a substantial decrease in word intelligibility. The hearing-impaired subjects performed an average of 7% poorer under the longer reverberation in the presence of noise and also in quiet. The normal subjects performed 15% poorer at longer reverberation only in the presence of masking noise. Data are presented describing the effects of these experimental conditions on perception of certain types of consonants and phonetic features of consonants.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access