Some Effects of Noise on the Speaking Behavior of Stutterers The purpose of the present research was to determine the influence of the loudness and spectrum of noise stimuli on stuttering frequency, reading rate, and vocal level. During each of six noise conditions and one non-noise condition, nine stutterers continuously read aloud prose passages during four successive five-minute periods. Low-pass ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1974
Some Effects of Noise on the Speaking Behavior of Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edward G. Conture
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1974
Some Effects of Noise on the Speaking Behavior of Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1974, Vol. 17, 714-723. doi:10.1044/jshr.1704.714
History: Received September 4, 1973 , Accepted April 23, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1974, Vol. 17, 714-723. doi:10.1044/jshr.1704.714
History: Received September 4, 1973; Accepted April 23, 1974

The purpose of the present research was to determine the influence of the loudness and spectrum of noise stimuli on stuttering frequency, reading rate, and vocal level. During each of six noise conditions and one non-noise condition, nine stutterers continuously read aloud prose passages during four successive five-minute periods. Low-pass (500-Hz cutoff frequency), high-pass (500-Hz cutoff frequency), and broad-band noise, psychophysically equated for loudness at two different levels, was presented during the third period of the six noise conditions. Stuttering frequency, reading rate, and vocal level were measured for the second and third periods of all conditions. The stutterers increased their vocal level while decreasing their stuttering frequency as a result of the loudness rather than the frequency spectrum of the noise. Reading rate was not significantly influenced by changes in the loudness or frequency spectrum of the noise. These results do not support the findings of others that low-pass noise decreases stuttering more than does high-pass noise.

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