Question Formation in the Language of Deaf Students Four hundred and twenty-two deaf students (age 10 to 19 years) and 60 hearing children (age eight to 10 years) responded to and judged the grammaticality of yes/no questions, wh-questions, and tag questions. Results indicated improvement with increasing age for deaf students. Even the youngest hearing students consistently obtained higher ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1974
Question Formation in the Language of Deaf Students
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. P. Quigley
    Institute for Research on Exceptional Children, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • R. B. Wilbur
    Institute for Research on Exceptional Children, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • D. S. Montanelli
    Institute for Research on Exceptional Children, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1974
Question Formation in the Language of Deaf Students
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1974, Vol. 17, 699-713. doi:10.1044/jshr.1704.699
History: Received January 8, 1974 , Accepted April 18, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1974, Vol. 17, 699-713. doi:10.1044/jshr.1704.699
History: Received January 8, 1974; Accepted April 18, 1974

Four hundred and twenty-two deaf students (age 10 to 19 years) and 60 hearing children (age eight to 10 years) responded to and judged the grammaticality of yes/no questions, wh-questions, and tag questions. Results indicated improvement with increasing age for deaf students. Even the youngest hearing students consistently obtained higher scores than most of the deaf students. Yes/no questions were easier to comprehend and judge the grammaticality of than were wh-questions, which, in turn, were easier than tag questions. The acceptability of question variants, such as “who did the boy hit the girl?” (copying) is also reported.

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