Social and Vocational Acceptability of Esophageal Speakers Compared to Normal Speakers This study explored the social and vocational acceptability of esophageal compared to normal speakers. Of specific interest was the estimation of the effect of (1) visual, auditory, and simultaneous audio-visual presentation of the speakers, and (2) simple expository introductions of the speakers. A group of 480 subjects, members of business ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1974
Social and Vocational Acceptability of Esophageal Speakers Compared to Normal Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stuart I. Gilmore
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1974
Social and Vocational Acceptability of Esophageal Speakers Compared to Normal Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1974, Vol. 17, 599-607. doi:10.1044/jshr.1704.599
History: Received August 23, 1972 , Accepted December 1, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1974, Vol. 17, 599-607. doi:10.1044/jshr.1704.599
History: Received August 23, 1972; Accepted December 1, 1973

This study explored the social and vocational acceptability of esophageal compared to normal speakers. Of specific interest was the estimation of the effect of (1) visual, auditory, and simultaneous audio-visual presentation of the speakers, and (2) simple expository introductions of the speakers. A group of 480 subjects, members of business and professional men’s groups, evaluated the four speakers on one social and three vocational criteria. Statistical analysis indicated the esophageal speakers were perceived as being significantly less acceptable than the normal speakers regardless of whether the judgments were based on visual, auditory, or simultaneous visual and auditory impressions. Information about the esophageal speakers significantly raised their acceptability, with the exception of the criterion of public contact in employment. The criterion measures used in this study might serve as objective indicators of the degree to which communicative disorders handicap adults.

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