EMG Activity within the Pharynx during Speech Production Electromyography (EMG) of the superior and middle constrictor muscles was recorded during phonated and whispered productions of the vowels /i/ and /a/ and the stop consonants /p/ and /b/ in VCVCV trisyllables. Lower levels of EMG activity were consistently associated with production of the voiced consonant /b/ than with comparable ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1974
EMG Activity within the Pharynx during Speech Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Fred D. Minifie
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • James H. Abbs
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • Arlene Tarlow
    Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Mitchell Kwaterski
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1974
EMG Activity within the Pharynx during Speech Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1974, Vol. 17, 497-504. doi:10.1044/jshr.1703.497
History: Received September 1, 1972 , Accepted March 5, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1974, Vol. 17, 497-504. doi:10.1044/jshr.1703.497
History: Received September 1, 1972; Accepted March 5, 1974

Electromyography (EMG) of the superior and middle constrictor muscles was recorded during phonated and whispered productions of the vowels /i/ and /a/ and the stop consonants /p/ and /b/ in VCVCV trisyllables. Lower levels of EMG activity were consistently associated with production of the voiced consonant /b/ than with comparable productions of the voiceless consonant /p/. Larger amplitude EMG signals were associated with vowel production than with consonant production. No systematic differences in muscle activity were observed as a function of phonated VS whispered productions. These findings are interpreted in relation to the active role of the pharynx during speech production.

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