Developmental Apraxia of Speech in Children with Defective Articulation To identify behaviors which might distinguish developmental apraxia of speech from “functional” articulation disorders, 30 children with moderate to severe defective articulation but with normal intelligence, hearing, and language abilities and with no apparent organic pathologic condition and a group of matched control subjects were given a battery of speech ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1974
Developmental Apraxia of Speech in Children with Defective Articulation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathe Allan Yoss
    Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota
  • Frederic L. Darley
    Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1974
Developmental Apraxia of Speech in Children with Defective Articulation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1974, Vol. 17, 399-416. doi:10.1044/jshr.1703.399
History: Received March 11, 1973 , Accepted February 28, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1974, Vol. 17, 399-416. doi:10.1044/jshr.1703.399
History: Received March 11, 1973; Accepted February 28, 1974

To identify behaviors which might distinguish developmental apraxia of speech from “functional” articulation disorders, 30 children with moderate to severe defective articulation but with normal intelligence, hearing, and language abilities and with no apparent organic pathologic condition and a group of matched control subjects were given a battery of speech and nonspeech tests. Pediatric neurologic examinations were completed for the subjects with defective articulation. Speech data were analyzed according to type of articulation error and by a method of distinctive-feature categorization. Highly significant differences were found between control and defective articulation subjects. A rationale was established for division of the defective articulation group on the basis of their performance on isolated volitional oral movement tasks. Combinations of variables that emerged as statistically significant differentiating predictors between these two subgroups of subjects with defective articulation were neurologic ratings, two- and three-feature errors, distortions, prolongations and repetitions, additions, one-place errors, and omissions. These behavioral differences support the conclusion that an identifiable developmental apraxia of speech exists in some children with defective articulation.

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