Effects of Age and Word Frequency on Object Recognition and Naming in Children Visual duration threshold, matching-response latencies, and object-naming latencies were obtained for 30 nine-year-old and 15 six-year-old, normal-speaking male children. Stimuli were drawings of objects whose names represent a wide range of frequency of occurrence in the language according to the Thorndike-Lorge word count. The nine-year-old children had significantly shorter visual-duration ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1974
Effects of Age and Word Frequency on Object Recognition and Naming in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Franklin J. Milianti
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Hines, Illinois
  • Walter L. Cullinan
    University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1974
Effects of Age and Word Frequency on Object Recognition and Naming in Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1974, Vol. 17, 373-385. doi:10.1044/jshr.1703.373
History: Received July 6, 1972 , Accepted December 1, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1974, Vol. 17, 373-385. doi:10.1044/jshr.1703.373
History: Received July 6, 1972; Accepted December 1, 1973

Visual duration threshold, matching-response latencies, and object-naming latencies were obtained for 30 nine-year-old and 15 six-year-old, normal-speaking male children. Stimuli were drawings of objects whose names represent a wide range of frequency of occurrence in the language according to the Thorndike-Lorge word count. The nine-year-old children had significantly shorter visual-duration thresholds, matching-response latencies and object-naming latencies than the nine-year-old children. The latency for object naming was negatively and significantly correlated with the logarithm of frequency of occurrence of the names, but neither visual duration threshold nor latency for matching correlated significantly with frequency of occurrence. The results support the hypothesis that the major source of variance in object-naming latencies for common and rare words is not attributable to the perceptual identification of the objects.

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