Relationship of Articulatory Defects to Speech-Sound Identification Normal-speaking and speech-defective children were compared on a speech-sound identification task which included sounds the speech-defective subjects misarticulated and sounds they articulated correctly. The identification task included four tests: [r]-[w] contrasts, acoustically similar contrasts, acoustically dissimilar contrasts, and vowel contrasts. The speech sounds were presented on a continuum from undistorted ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1974
Relationship of Articulatory Defects to Speech-Sound Identification
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lorraine M. Monnin
    California State University, Los Angeles, California
  • Dorothy A. Huntington
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1974
Relationship of Articulatory Defects to Speech-Sound Identification
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1974, Vol. 17, 352-366. doi:10.1044/jshr.1703.352
History: Received January 10, 1974 , Accepted January 17, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1974, Vol. 17, 352-366. doi:10.1044/jshr.1703.352
History: Received January 10, 1974; Accepted January 17, 1974

Normal-speaking and speech-defective children were compared on a speech-sound identification task which included sounds the speech-defective subjects misarticulated and sounds they articulated correctly. The identification task included four tests: [r]-[w] contrasts, acoustically similar contrasts, acoustically dissimilar contrasts, and vowel contrasts. The speech sounds were presented on a continuum from undistorted signals to severely distorted speech signals under conditions which have caused confusion among adults. Subjects included 15 normal-speaking kindergarten children, 15 kindergarten children with defective [r]s, and 15 preschool-age children. The procedure employed was designed to test, in depth, each sound under study and to minimize extraneous variables. Speech-sound identification ability of speech-defective subjects was found to be specific rather than a general deficiency, indicating a positive relationship between production and identification ability.

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