Comprehension of Relativized Sentences by Deaf Students Approximately 450 deaf students (25 males and 25 females at each age from 10 to 18 years) and 60 hearing students (10 males and 10 females at each age from 8 to 10 years) were given the 22 parts of the Test of Syntactic Abilities. Reported here are the results ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1974
Comprehension of Relativized Sentences by Deaf Students
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. P. Quigley
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • N. L. Smith
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • R. B. Wilbur
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1974
Comprehension of Relativized Sentences by Deaf Students
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1974, Vol. 17, 325-341. doi:10.1044/jshr.1703.325
History: Received August 6, 1973 , Accepted February 12, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1974, Vol. 17, 325-341. doi:10.1044/jshr.1703.325
History: Received August 6, 1973; Accepted February 12, 1974

Approximately 450 deaf students (25 males and 25 females at each age from 10 to 18 years) and 60 hearing students (10 males and 10 females at each age from 8 to 10 years) were given the 22 parts of the Test of Syntactic Abilities. Reported here are the results from the three tests dealing with relativization: processing, embedding, and copying. These tests required the students to make a judgment of correct or incorrect for stimulus sentences. Results for all three tests indicated improvement with increasing age for the 10- to 18-year-old deaf students. The hearing students, although much younger, obtained higher scores on all three tests. Results concerning specific problems in syntax revealed (1) the position and function of the relative clause affected its difficulty; (2) with medially embedded relative clauses, students tended to join the NP of the relative clause with the VP of the main sentence thus misunderstanding the sentence; (3) when conjoining two sentences, students tended to delete coreferential subjects and objects; and (4) the possessive form NP’s was accepted by deaf students when the possessive form whose was the correct form.

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